Public Health, Spring 1998
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Title Graphic

Empowerment has become a catchword of the nineties, but, in presenting this issue of Public Health to you, it is hard to refrain from evoking the concept of empowerment.

Our cover feature tells the story of a diverse partnership's attempts to empower an inner-city Atlanta community to improve the health of its children who suffer with asthma. As one member of the partnership, CDC's William Parra, says, "In public health, we are moving to a new paradigm, where we involved the community not at the end of the research project but from the beginning as a part of the whole process."

The Go Girls and Eat for Life projects, directed by Professor Ken Resnicow, are community-based science approaches to understanding how to prevent adult obesity and promote physical activity. By necessity, the approach involves community members in the design, implementation, and evaluation of the research.

And, finally, in the Graduate Certificate Program at Emory, the Rollins School of Public Health is utilizing distance-based learning technologies to provide courses to experienced public health professionals while they continue to work in their own communities.

Through these efforts, community citizens and students gain knowledge and skills they need. The two-way communications ensure that those of us involved with teaching and research equally benefit. Empowerment works both ways.


JAMES W. CURRAN, MD, MPH
Dean


Spring 1998 Issue | Dean's Message | Asthma Zappers | Cyber Class | Go Girls & Eat for Life
Flagging Cancer | School Sampler | Philanthropy | Alumni Sampler
WHSC | RSPH

Copyright Emory University, 2001. All Rights Reserved.
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